Did you know that coffee culture around the world can vary as much as language or cuisine? From elegant cafés to elaborate ceremonies, the ways in which these five countries drink coffee are quite different from our habits in the United States. Perhaps one will inspire you to try a new coffee ritual of your own. Contact us about our selection of specialty coffees to help you get started.

Austria: The kaffehaus is a centuries-old tradition that has hosted Viennese cultural and intellectual life since the Hapsburg era. Some elegant original establishments remain today alongside newer versions with different charms of their own. (Source: Lonely Planet)

Ethiopia: Ethiopia is both a major coffee grower and home to an elaborate coffee-drinking tradition. The Ethiopian coffee ceremony, which takes at least an hour and a half, includes ritual roasting of the beans followed by multiple rounds of different brews. It is a key component in Ethiopian business and social negotiations, as well as a must-accept invitation. (Source: Food 52)

France: For many, Paris is synonymous with fashionable people enjoying coffee and croissants in charming cafés. Scores of such cafés have served food and drink to a stream of customers, including celebrated writers and artists, for over four centuries. (Source: A Woman's Paris)

Italy: In Italy, coffee-house culture began in Venice and quickly spread throughout the region. The Italian coffee menu centers on espresso. There are espresso drinks for various times of day, including cappuccino (with milk) in the morning and corretto (with liquor) in the evening, as well as numerous regional specialties. (Source: Italy magazine)

Turkey: Turkish coffee houses have hosted social gatherings, cultural exchanges, and even puppet theatre productions since the mid 1500s. The Ottoman court held grandiose ceremonies to prepare coffee for the sultan. In private homes, coffee grounds are sometimes used for fortune telling, and the long-spouted Turkish coffee pot is famous around the world. (Source: Turkish Cultural Foundation)

Comments

0 comments

Write a comment