Regions of Coffee

Coffee was once associated with late night cramming before a big exam or a sweet and decadent caffeinated treat. Those days have since passed, as our tastes have changed. We now find ourselves more aware of the different tastes of coffee beans from different areas of the world, as well as the brewing techniques used to achieve different varieties of coffees. In short, coffee drinkers have evolved!

While many coffee drinkers' tastes have evolved, that does not mean everyone knows from where their beans came. We'd like to take a moment to share with you the different regions that help us fulfill our various caffeinated needs.

  • Central America

Central America is made up of seven countries: Belize, Guatemala, El Salvador, Honduras, Nicaragua, Costa Rica and Panama. Of the seven, Belize is the only country to not offer coffee production.

Coffees from Central America offer the perfect balance of fine sweetness with a touch of tart, fruity acidity. Coffee from this area of the world has great influenced North American's coffee-drinking tastes.

  • South America

While South America is a large continent in itself, only four of its countries produce coffee: Colombia, Brazil, Ecuador, and Bolivia. Of those four, Brazil ranks as the largest coffee producer in the world. The United States receives 25 percent of its coffee beans from Brazil.

Coffee from this region has a tendency to be chocolate-y and/or sweet in taste, especially those from Colombia. Less acidity in nature, South American coffee is said to have nuttiness in its flavor. 

South American coffee shares similarities in its taste with that of Central America.

  • Africa

Africa is quite large: 11,677,239 square miles large, in fact. The Dark Continent vast span is made up of 54 countries. With that number, only three of them - Ethiopia, Kenya, and Uganda - are coffee producers.

Our culture's intense association with coffee had its beginnings in Ethiopia, during the tenth century. It was during the Sufi pilgrimage that coffee found its way throughout the Middle East. From there, the beans made their way into Europe, eventually advancing to the colonies, including Indonesia and the Americas.

Africa is quite large: 11,677,239 square miles large, in fact. The Dark Continent vast span is made up of 54 countries. With that number, only three of them - Ethiopia, Kenya, and Uganda - are coffee producers.

Our culture's intense association with coffee had its beginnings in Ethiopia, during the tenth century. It was during the Sufi pilgrimage that coffee found its way throughout the Middle East. From there, the beans made their way into Europe, eventually advancing to the colonies, including Indonesia and the Americas.

Ethiopia has three main regions from its beans originate: Harrar, Ghimbi, and Sidamo. Harrar coffee is noted for being wine-esque, with fruity, floral-toned acidity, while. Ghimbi coffee is noted for its balance in taste, as well as acidity both sharp as well as rich. Sidamo's Yirgacheffe coffee beans are noted for their sweetness as well as their scent, earning them the honor of being some of the highest ranked coffees in the world.

Kenya's coffee beans are grown just above 6,600 feet above sea level. This altitude attributes to the coffee's fullness as well as well as a strong flavor with a enjoyable acidity. It is also worth noting that the beans are also said to have an aftertaste that is both citrusy as well as berry.

A large amount of Ugandan coffee is what is known as Robusta. It is strong and full-bodied, with an earthiness in its flavor as well as being bitterer than Arabica beans. The Arabica beans are very similar in taste to Kenyan beans.

  • Asia

Coffees from this region - in particular, Ethiopia, India, and Indonesia - tend to be noted for their earthiness, as being darker than most blends. The beans here are also lower in their acidity as well as offering complexity and savoriness.

 

So, as you can see, there is quite a lot to be offered when asked, "What kind of coffee would you like?” We aim to make your coffee selection as easy as can be. We look forward to helping you to make a coffee connection!

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